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New Republic Marlinspike by Nick B

 

Marlinspike

New Republic Brewing Co.

College Station, TX

English Porter

ABV: 5.8%

IBUs: 35

Packaging: Draft, 12oz. Cans

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I want to┬átake you on a little trip down Memory Lane into Aggieland and explain why New Republic holds a little spot in my heart…

Back in 2013, I was starting to get more into craft beer, but I wasn’t nearly as “snobby” as I am now. I had gone on a few dates with this beautiful Aggie and as we went to plan our next outing, she suggested, “Hey, there is a brewery here in College Station. Would you want to check it out?” To skip forward two and a half years, I married that woman and she still indulges me with the whole craft beer “hobby” as some may call it. So shout out to my wife for introducing me to this great, little brewery out in the sticks of College Station. She is, in a way, my marlinspike… Helping me to untie the knots in this journey on the sea of life. Now to talk about Marlinspike, the beer:

Marlinspike, as well as the other can labels from New Republic, are so clean, but just kind of busy in my opinion. Marlinspike may be the least busy of the lineup though and has one of the better color combinations. A cream colored background features a marlinspike behind an upward slanting white banner with Marlinspike in red in the middle and Moreish Porter in blue at the bottom. “What So Proudly We Hail” dons the top of the label.

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When I poured Marlinspike into my trusty Beer Chronicle pint glass, it poured a chestnut color with a light brown head that disappeared quickly. The aroma was heavy with tree nuts, especially cashews and almonds. It was a little strange, but cashews are my favorite so it was intriguing to find that aroma in a beer.

Upon first sip, Marlinspike has a medium mouthfeel and my palate is met by light roasted coffee that is followed by those tree nut flavors. The tree nuts provide a sweetness that balances out the coffee bitterness and makes for an enjoyable experience. Now I see why they call it a “moreish porter,” with moreish meaning “causing a desire for more.” I could drink more than one in a single sitting no matter the weather.

Marlinspike was impressive and fits the style, but it didn’t blow me away. I think it is well done for the style, as it is low in ABV and balanced. Another beer that it makes me think of is Rogue’s Hazelnut Brown Nectar. Marlinspike, and English porters in general, are good introductions to “darker beers.” So what do you think? Does a beer that smells like cashews intrigue you? Everyone knows it’s the best tree nut! Beers to you, Houston.

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Nick B
nick.b@beerchronicle.com

Nick is originally from the Corpus Christi area, but found himself in Houston as of 4 years ago. You can spot him wearing a Hooks hat and drinking a glass of craft beer around the city. He typically prefers his beers to mirror his taste in music: complex, heavy, and dark.

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